To recognise or not to recognise: The place of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' in the Australian Constitution.

Date
Tue, 07/08/2012 - 12:45
Location

Theatre, National Library of Australia, Canberra

The Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies proudly presents the Wentworth Lecture 2012, delivered by Professor Megan Davis.To recognise or not to recognise: The place of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples' in the Australian Constitution.

Expert member of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues and Director, Indigenous Law Centre and Professor, Faculty of Law, UNSW.

Date: Tuesday 7 August 2012

Venue: Theatre, National Library of Australia, Parkes Place, Parkes, ACT

Time: 12:45 - 2:00pm (doors open 12.30)

PLEASE NOTE THAT SPACES FOR THE LECTURE ARE LIMITED

To secure your space, please email: invitations@aiatsis.gov.au or call  02 6246 1118.

The Wentworth Lecture is a free public lecture established by AIATSIS to honour the contribution of the late Hon. W.C. Wentworth, AO to the Institute's establishment and development.

Professor Megan Davis

Dr Davis is an expert on public and international law. She was appointed by the Federal government in 2011 to the Expert Panel on the Recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples in the Constitution.

She is also a UN expert member of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples and holds the portfolios of Administration of Justice, Gender and Women and Intellectual property and indigenous knowledge. Dr Davis was also the Rapporteur of the UNPFII Expert Group Meeting on Violence against Indigenous Women in New York earlier this year.

Dr Davis has extensive experience as an international human rights lawyer and participated in the drafting of the UNDRIP from 1999-2004. She is a former UN Fellow of the UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights in Geneva and has participated as an international lawyer in Indigenous legal advocacy, UN working groups and expert seminars at the United Nations for over a decade.